Detecting Signs of Hearing Loss in Someone You Love

///Detecting Signs of Hearing Loss in Someone You Love
One of the signs of hearing loss is asking you to repeat your words more often.

One of the signs of hearing loss is asking you to repeat your words more often.

Signs and symptoms along with solutions to stay connected.

You may suspect that your loved one is showing signs of hearing loss – but how can you know for sure? While you don’t know what they’re feeling, you do know how they are reacting to you and the rest of the world around them. Here are a few of the most common signs and symptoms that you may have noticed, including:

  • Asking you to repeat your words more often
  • Not responding to your questions or requests
  • The television, radio, or other media is louder than you remember
  • It takes longer to turn off the alarm clock
  • Being unusually quiet in a restaurant or bustling environment
  • Declining more social events than they used to

If you notice one or more of these tendencies in someone you care about, here are some practical tips to make communicating easier and more comfortable for everyone.

  • Asking you to repeat your words more often
    Everyone requires repeating from time to time. But if you notice that an important person in your life is saying “pardon me?” more frequently these days, they may be experiencing hearing loss. Your first instinct may be to shout or talk slowly to them, but try not to. Your best bet is to speak more clearly so they can hear you better.

          Watch this video on how to communicate when a loved one has difficulty hearing.

  • Not responding to your questions or requests
    We’ve all been there. We ask our special someone to unload the dishwasher or pick up milk at the grocery store, and we think they ignore us. Are these overt attempts to sidestep responsibility, or something else? If you notice this behavior coupled with one or more symptoms of hearing loss on this list, consider giving them a break as they simply may not have heard you. When talking to someone with hearing loss, make sure you have their attention first before you repeat your question or request. This will help ensure smoother communication.

 

  • The television, radio, or other media is louder than you remember
    Have you noticed that someone you care about is listening to media at a louder volume than usual? Keep in mind that while you may find it to be too loud, they find it comfortable. TV Ears® or another active listening device can be wonderful solutions for households who prefer different volume settings.

  Review Everyday Hearing’s 2017 Guide to Watching TV with Hearing Loss to find a device that fits your budget and lifestyle.

  • It takes longer to turn off the alarm clock
    When the daily 6AM buzzer sounds off, does your loved one take longer to hit the “snooze” button – or do they sleep right through it? This could be a sign of hearing loss. Consider replacing a traditional device with one that has an extra-loud alarm, a bed-shaking feature, or flashing lights.

  Check out these 10 life-changing alarm clocks for people with hearing loss

  Use this helpful infographic to learn how your loved one can enjoy dining out with hearing loss.

  • Declining more social events than they used to
    Social events can become challenging for people with hearing loss. People, traffic, and other sounds can be distracting. If someone you care about is more hesitant to commit to social invitations, they may begin to feel disconnected from those they love. When going out socially, think about places and activities that are free from excess noise. An easy-to-use captioned telephone that allows them to read everything the caller is saying can help them stay in the loop when at home.

  Discover how CapTel captioned telephones work here.

For more insight into the signs and symptoms of hearing loss, check out our extensive blog of hearing loss articles. Learn more about CapTel captioned telephones CapTel Captioned Telephone

2018-01-17T18:51:11+00:00January 5th, 2018|Hearing Loss Blog Posts|